Teacher can discuss how he/she does not play with that toy anymore because of outgrowing students say they outgrow.

Tell students This book unit provides activities for before, during and after r . How many of them incorporated similar elements into their rooms? Why or why not? Provide the children with similar materials along with catalogs featuring housewares and furniture. Peter’s Chair, by the award winning author Ezra Jack Keats, is a wonderful story for children adjusting to new siblings in the home. Then “MAXimize” your read-aloud time with the included close reading worksheet and two-part writing activity which focuses on the skill of compare/contrast. with current pictures. Have children take turns trying to use lengths of yarn to match the babies with the older children. How are they different?

Peter's mother tells him to play quietly because Suzie is napping. How are the two the same? Use a digital camera to take a current picture of each student and print out the pictures.

Teachers Pay Teachers is an online marketplace where teachers buy and sell original educational materials.

Ezra Jack Keats was a Caldecott Medal-winning picture book author and illustrator. Oh no! On the other rung of the chair, students can draw Peter giving his chair to his parents. On a rung of the chair, students can draw Peter looking "jealous."

Discuss good readers make predictions that are both right and wrong, but then Describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges. His books include Peter's Chair, Whistle for Willy, and the timeless classic The Snowy Day. How are they different? Download the PDF from here. What made Peter change his mind about giving his chair to Suzie? Do they remember when their younger siblings were babies? Tools Have students try to label the picture with the word "jealous." Peter's new baby sister, Suzie, seems to be taking over the whole house. Discus how Peter feels when he couldn't fit in the chair anymore. Discuss which predictions were correct.

Can students discuss vocabulary words and use them properly? Are you getting the free resources, updates, and special offers we send out every week in our teacher newsletter?

Ezra Jack Keats Peter's Chair Lesson ideas for kindergarten and first grade includes reading, writing, retelling, a craft, STEM, and more! What features do all the baby pictures and all the older children's pictures have in common, despite ethnicity?

of themselves as a baby. Peter's mother tells him to play quietly because Suzie is napping. Peter's Chair - comprehension. Post the baby pictures in a vertical line on one side of a bulletin board. this is the "solution." Encourage invented spelling. After Reading: When Peter leaves home, he takes his baby picture with him. As long as they guess correctly, allow each child to continue to try making matches. Subjects: Balanced Literacy, Reading Strategies.

Who gave the favorite toy to you? Use our Text-Dependent Questions to model close reading and spark a great discussion about the central message of the story: change is both difficult and rewarding. When Peter spots his old chair, he decides to take the chair and run away so they won't give that to the baby, too! 1–2.

How Peter finally comes to volunteer to paint the little chair pink himself makes for a delightfully universal story about growing up. Answer keys are included and may also be used for handwriting practice or for modified work.

Also, provide each student with a piece of lightweight cardboard or oaktag (approximately 9 inches by 12 inches). If you recall a favorite toy from your past, talk about it. When Peter spots his old chair, he decides to take the chair and run away so they won't give that to the baby, too! Ask what students think will be happening in the story based on pictures. Discuss how Peter begins to accept change. Discus how Peter feels when he couldn't fit in the chair anymore. When a student guesses incorrectly, allow another student to have a turn. Discuss how Peter begins to accept change. Chart things that students say they outgrow. Describe how words and phrases (e.g., regular beats, alliteration, rhymes, repeated lines) supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song. What did they do when they felt jealous?

Compare and contrast two or more versions of the same story (e.g., Cinderella stories) by different authors or from different cultures. Have students attempt to match the baby Add notes & annotations through an interactive layer and assign to students via Google Classroom.

Explore the Ezra Jack Keats story about a boy who is jealous of his little sister.

Have students cover the cardboard with glued-on pieces of wallpaper scraps (gluing a strip of contrasting paper along the bottom of the cardboard to create a ground line). Grades: Kindergarten, 1 st, 2 nd, Homeschool. Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its characters, setting, or plot. Peter's new baby sister, Suzie, seems to be taking over the whole house. Students who brought in pictures can look at the photos for help in drawing their pictures.

Peter resists until he makes a surprising discovery: he's too big to fit in his old chair!

On the legs of the chair, have students attempt to write the name of each character. Go over chart of predictions. When all photo pairs have been correctly identified (and joined by lengths of yarn tacked to the board), ask children to notice physical features that are the same (e.g., hair color, skin color, etc.) Then “MAXimize” your read-aloud time with the included close reading worksheet and two-part writing activity which focuses on the skill of compare/contrast. Open the preview to see all the pages in the packet. Students can also Use our Text-Dependent Questions to model close reading and spark a great discussion about the central message of the story: change is both difficult and rewarding. to send in a baby picture of themselves.

Do any of the rooms look exactly alike? Why does this toy mean so much to you? Ask "I wonder" questions, such as: I wonder why Peter is feeling with everything getting painted pink.

Chart answers. What favorite toys do some

they go back and make sure they know which predictions were right. Discuss the meaning of the following vocabulary words: rascal, cradle, jealous, sharing. Students can then attempt to write "share.". Take a picture walk.

Have the children imagine all the reasons why Peter was jealous of Suzie (e.g., she got to use his crib and high chair, Mother and Father were paying lots of attention to Suzie, etc.). With the arrival of a new baby sister, Peter's dad is painting Peter's old baby furniture pink! Ask students to help find the place in the book Father is painting Peter's old crib and highchair pink because they belong to Suzie now.

Teacher observation. Discuss favorite toys. Types: Guided Reading Books, Printables, Literacy Center Ideas. Father is painting Peter's old crib and highchair pink because they belong to Suzie now.

of Peter as he appears now. If you receive pictures Have the children take turns describing in as much detail as possible what it feels like to be jealous of the baby.

Use a paper border or yarn to divide a bulletin board in half vertically. Have children share their results. Then students attempt to match drawings and features that have changed (e.g., height, weight, etc.). Provide students with envelopes that include a letter asking for parents "When I look at this cover, I see that the Have the children examine Peter’s baby pictures and the illustrations Have the children examine Peter's baby picture and the illustration of Peter as he appears now. How Peter finally comes to volunteer to paint the little chair pink himself makes for a delightfully uni… On the seat of the chair, students can attempt to draw a room in Peter's house. picture with each current picture. of the students in the class have? If all students do not send in a picture, have students draw pictures Then, post the children's recent photos on the other side of the board. Reported resources will be reviewed by our team. Use these activities and lessons to introduce students to Keats's work. This award-winning read aloud, “Peter’s Chair” by Ezra Jack Keats, is a sweet text to use for teaching the CCSS for Reading Literature 1, 2, 3, 4, 7 and 9. Then, have children cut items from the catalog and glue these onto the wallpaper to design a room of their dreams.