The British New Wave is a style of films released in Great Britain between 1959 and 1963.

The top 23 films, all appearing on 2 or more “Best British New Wave” movie lists, are ranked below by how many times they appear. We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website.

As the 1960s carried on, the New Wave ended quicker than its fellow movements across Europe. Most of these films are often about the lives and struggles of the working class, especially in Northern England. They produced the grim and darker sides of ordinary life, the grittiest of communities, and its characters as “angry young men”—a phrase widely associated with the movement. Within time, it faded away; however, its principles and styles continue to flourish and influence contemporary British filmmakers and filmmakers worldwide. Grim working-class life, angry young men, kitchen-sink realism, and gritty locations filled with colorful characters — these are just a few ways to describe the films of the British New Wave. Its style is somewhat like the cinema vérité that observes and documents the way social issues existed.

Click Here for more information. Whether or not the British films of the time were part of the New Wave movement, this film opened up doors and broadened the horizons to many filmmakers in the British film industry. The remaining 20 movies, as well as the sources we used, are in alphabetical order on the bottom of the page. Top 23 British New Wave Movies.

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However, they died out by 1960.

These new wave films have literary offshoots. While the British New Wave was, more often than not, synonymous with smaller productions, British cinema was beginning to gain more financial backing from American studios, which in turn influenced productions to focus more on genre pictures (often inspired by the nation's currently cultural phenomenon) than politically driven "assault on the suburban vapidity of British film-making" had … The first new wave movie, ‘Room at the Top’, came out in 1959 and the last one came out in 1963. Most of these films are often about the lives and struggles of the working class, especially in Northern England. A whole genre of literature has been influenced by these films.

Its style is somewhat like the cinema vérité that observes and documents the way social issues existed. As the 1960s carried on, the New Wave ended quicker than its fellow movements across Europe.

This is probably because the British new wave was pretty short-lived as well. These new wave films are often attributed to the “Kitchen-sink realism,” which existed in fiction and was produced (approximately the same time) in Britain. The label is a translation of Nouvelle Vague, the French term first applied to the films of François Truffaut, and Jean-Luc Godard among others. As the 1960s carried on, the New Wave ended quicker than its fellow movements across Europe.

Beautiful, interesting, incredible cinema. There is an element of truth in that, to be fair, but the conventional reading of British film history (basically: 30s - pre-history, 40s - war films, Ealing and David Lean, 50s - dull, 60s - New Wave and Swinging London, 70s - rubbish, 80s - renaissance) is so restrictive that it is amazing how long its basic elements have remained in place.

Within time, it faded away; however, its principles and styles continue to flourish and influence contemporary British filmmakers and filmmakers worldwide.

British New Wave Films. They produced the grim and darker sides of ordinary life, the grittiest of communities, and its characters as “angry young men”—a phrase widely associated with the movement. Within…. These new wave films are often attributed to the “Kitchen-sink realism,” which existed in fiction and was produced (approximately the same time) in Britain. Room at the Top taught many people that they did not need to make a London-based film in order to create an interesting story for the international audience.