[citation needed]. (Rawl.C.136). He had a distinguished career as a soldier and patron of music. They received the title of counts in 1626 and the Forchtenstein line received the title of Fürst from the Holy Roman Emperor in 1712. He had a distinguished career as a soldier and patron of music. Nikolaus Esterházy was the son of Prince Joseph (József Simon Antal, 1688–1721), and the younger brother of Prince Paul Anton (Pál Antal, 1711–1762). Contents. Paul Anton formally assumed the duties of office in 1734. The wealthy baron smilingly replied, " My shepherds are more numerous than your sheep." His father died when he was young, and the stewardship of the Esterházy was taken on by regents. Life. At the outbreak of the Seven Years' War in 1756, he fought as a General of the Cavalry[4] and was promoted to Field Marshal in 1758. In 1810 he was accredited to the court of Dresden, where he tried in vain to detach Saxony from Napoleon, and in 1814 he accompanied his father on a secret mission to Rome. https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Paul_II_Anton,_Prince_Esterházy&oldid=985771191, Austrian military personnel of the War of the Austrian Succession, Freemasons of the Premier Grand Lodge of England, Short description is different from Wikidata, Articles containing Hungarian-language text, Pages using infobox royalty with unknown parameters, Wikipedia articles with WORLDCATID identifiers, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, Donna Mária Anna Louisa dei Marchesi Lunatti-Visconti, Prince Paul II Anton Esterházy de Galántha, Mária Octavia, Baroness Gilleis of Theras and Sonnenberg, This page was last edited on 27 October 2020, at 21:20. At the time of the Napoleonic Wars he worked for the Austrian Empire as a diplomat. Nikolaus was born in Vienna 12 December 1765, the son of Prince Anton Esterházy and his first wife, Maria Theresia, Countess Erdödy de Monyorokerek et Monoszlo (1745–1782). Prince Pál Antal Esterházy de Galántha (German: Paul Anton Esterházy von Galantha; 11 March 1786 – 21 May 1866) was a Hungarian prince, a member of the famous Esterházy family. He studied at Vienna and Leiden, and learned to speak French and German fluently. According to the New Grove, Paul Anton could speak French and German, and "oversaw the Europeanization of the court at Eisenstadt. [8] While looking upon a very beautiful flock of two thousand sheep, the Lord of Holkham inquired if Esterhazy could show as fine a flock upon his estates. Since this provided Haydn with his own orchestra, with ample opportunities to compose symphonies for it to perform, the appointment was of great consequence for the growing status of the symphony and thus for the history of music.[5]. He had a distinguished career as a soldier and patron of music. On 13 January 1763 Anton married Maria Theresia, Gräfin (Countess) Erdödy de Monyorokerek et Monoszlo (1745–1782) in Vienna. (Daily Advertiser, (London), 9 August 1733).[1]. In 1824 he represented Austria as ambassador extraordinary at the coronation of Charles X of France, and was the premier Austrian commissioner at the London conferences of 1830–1836.[2]. When in 1791 Anton wrote Haydn asking him to return to compose and direct an opera celebrating Anton's installation as Lord Lieutenant of Oedenberg, Haydn refused, as he had entered into contractual obligations. From then on he was involved in humanitarian and cultural activities. In this war (1741–1748), he led a regiment of hussars[3] which he had raised himself. Later Esterházy took connections with the immigrated politicians. 1 Life; 2 Military career; 3 Anton and Joseph Haydn; 4 Notes; 5 References; Life. At the time of Anton's birth his father Nikolaus Esterházy bore the title Graf (Count) Esterházy de Galántha. Seeing that his pacifying intentions ended in failure, he resigned from his position in September. In August 1733, in London, he became a freemason: On Tuesday last Prince Anthony Esterházy, lately arrived here, and another german Nobleman, a Relative to the Elector of Mentz, were admitted Free and Accepted Masons, at the French Lodge, held the first and third Tuesday of every Month, at the Duke of Lorraine's head in Suffolk Street. He reigned as prince for only four years, dying unexpectedly of a sudden illness in 1794. His father died when he was young, and the stewardship of the Esterházy was taken on by regents. (Daily Advertiser, (London), 9 August 1733).[1]. [1] Anton married his second wife 9 July 1785 in Vienna: she was Maria Anna, Gräfin von Hohenfeld (1768–1848). On 7 April 1848 he was appointed as Minister besides the King in the first cabinet of Hungary which was controlled by Count Lajos Batthyány. [1], Jones offers an account of one motivation for Anton's cutbacks: prior to his accession, Anton himself had been a spendthrift, and his father Nikolaus was worried about the long-term solvency of the family. At the time of Anton's birth his father Nikolaus Esterházy bore the title Graf (Count) Esterházy de Galántha. Prince Esterhazy, a Hungarian baron, is probably the richest man, who is not seated on a throne, in the world.